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Completely flourless egg muffins, this time with bacon, pork mince, red bell pepper, onion and kale.


Flourless breakfast muffins, the pork mince version (18)

What
18 eggs
220g bacon, chopped
220g pork mince, break apart in pan
1 white onion, chopped
1 red bell pepper, chopped
100g kale, finely chopped
salt, pepper and other spices that you think will make this interesting…

How
1. All eggs in giant mixing bowl.
2. Chop everything else.
3. Pre-heat oven to… 180° C, or even 200° C (350 – 400° F).
3. Cook bacon and onions in pan. (Bacon first, add onions once there is lots of bacon fat all over.)
4. Cook mince and kale in pan. (Mince first, add kale once mince is cooked. Mix up with spatula.)
5. Add everything to giant mixing bowl and mix very well.
6. Divide into 18 muffin cups. I use (and love) silicone forms.
7. Bake at 180° C – 200° C (350 – 400° F) for 10-15min until the egg muffins rise well. My oven is old an creative with temperature, hence vague temperature and time guideline…

Stats
*Note: these are very rough numbers with a lot of “let’s just round this up” going on.

Total for 18 muffins:
2 627kCal
194g fat
36g net cho
189g protein

Per muffin:
146 kCal
11g fat
2g net cho
10,5g protein


 

These egg muffins are easy to make, I promise, even if you suck at making food. Making so many at once will save you a lot of time and sweat throughout the rest of the week, so the effort really is worth it.

I added pork mince this time, purely because there was a sale and I couldn’t ignore the price, especially considering I live in Norwegia where good food hardly ever comes at a good price.

Process, in pictures

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As  always, you live and learn… Once I had added all the ingredients into the mixing bowl, I realised the mixture was a bit too solid and not eggy enough. I started with a dozen eggs, so I decided to add half a dozen more. Random decision, I think four would have been enough.

Cooking time was a very approximate 15min. I’ve made these before a long time ago in a better oven far, far away. That time it took 10 minutes to get delicious egg muffins, this time I had to experiment. My mom was telling the absolute truth when she told me that you always have to get to know your oven first… It’s a long-term relationship that shouldn’t be based on false expectations.

A note about using silicone pans: put them on the oven rack before you add any ingredients! They are soft and you will spill all the raw ‘dough’ out if you try to pick it up like a normal, rigid pan. Other than that, they are awesome, the best thing being the  almost non-existent cleaning time. 🙂

 

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And, done!

I was freaking hungry while making these,  so it was great to finally to dig into a hot, fresh egg muffin! I added some avocado that needed to be eaten asap. AND a great surprise from my not-so-great oven was that there was still a little bit of hot runny egg yolk in the middle.

I used to hate egg yolks when I was little. I have no idea what was wrong with me.

I added rosemary and basil to this recipe and I’m very happy with the result. Will repeat.

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Sometimes a good thought strikes when you least expect it.

Today I wanted something after spending a few hours in a cold pool teaching many a kidlette how to swim.

Something warm and smooth, preferably.

And there it is!
Well, this is what it is:


50g plain Philadelphia cream cheese

2 teaspoons deepest darkest cacao

Dash of cinnamon

Microwave 45sec.

Mix it up.


Success! 😀


Aubergine (eggplant) Pizza: the minced meat version

  • Slice an aubergine into slices about 1cm thick. Long slices, round slices, whatever you want.
  • Sprinkle coarse salt over aubergine slices and let them sit for about 30min. The salt should draw some of the moisture out.
  • Pre-heat oven to 180deg celsius.
  • Lightly press slices with a paper towel, place slices in an oven dish or baking paper, sprinkle with a little olive oil.
  • Bake for about 30min (time depends on thickness of slices).
  • Smear a little tomato paste on each and cover with a thin layer of minced meat (ground beef).
  • Bake for 15min.
  • Take out and cover with spices (eg. salt, pepper, garlic, oregano), cheese and red peppers.
  • Bake for 5-10min, until cheese is melted and as crispy as you want it.

 

No, I’m obviously not a precise-recipe person. I generally just open the fridge and figure it out from there.

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Eggplant pizza! Yes, the red pepper slices rolled off a bit… I was impatient.

 

This recipe is thanks to a great friend who went out of her way to make me a keto-friendly dinner! How awesome is that. Supportive friends are absolute gold in a world where judgement can be quick and brutal.

And now I have found my new Friday-night food! I can also confirm that it tastes good cold the next morning, too. (Or maybe I was just really hungry…)

This recipe is a billion times easier, and cheaper, than making any of the low-carb pizza doughs. I love those, but I’m so excited about these that it’ll be a while before I make cauliflower or mozzarella dough again.

Eggplant ftw!

 

This post is a good two months overdue, which is crazy considering how much I love these two things!

I’ve made chocolate torte a few times now. Traditionally a type of layer cake with minimal flour, it’s a winner when you get it just right.

The basis of this torte is butter, chocolate and eggs. That’s it.

The tricksy bit is in the making and baking of. Overbaking the batter is fine, you will just end up with drier and more cake-y torte. Erring the other way is actually better. Underbake it a little and… oh my, it is beautifully dense and moist (yes) after warming it up a little the next day. I don’t care if it’s meant to be eaten warmed up or not, that’s the way I want it.

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Heated torte with cream cheese frosting!

Optional, and highly recommended, toppings include a simple cream cheese frosting, chocolate ganache for even more chocolate, or even just whipped cream with strawberries.

The mother of all partners for a warm bite of torte is, however, a fresh batch of cold, rich, creamy ice cream! Yes please!

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Freshly made ice cream with a hot piece of torte in the middle! Life is peaking.

My sister has an ice cream maker, which is a dangerously awesome kitchen appliance to have standing around. We’ve been making mostly vanilla ice cream (it’s fantastic), but we decided to go for broke and try adding green tea after receiving a giant bag as a gift.

And, green tea ice cream is amazing! The flavour isn’t overpowering at all, it blends just right with the mixture of creamy vanilla. And it definitely makes a great partner with dark, dark chocolate.

Real ice cream is very energy dense, so humble portions are the order of the day:

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Yum and yummo.

 

Okay, recipes!


Chocolate torte

*Recipe adapted from here, credit where credit is very much due.

  • 200g dark chocolate (preferably 85% + cocoa)
  • 200g butter  (can also experiment with coconut oil)
  • 5 large eggs
  • erythritol to taste (I add about 3 tablespoons, not more, but I like bitterness. I also cannot stand the aftertaste of stevia, so use it if you prefer it!)
  1.  Brown butter in a saucepan.
  2. Once the butter is nice and brown, add the chocolate in pieces and melt slowly. Don’t burn anything.
  3. Add sweetener to taste.
  4. Turn off heat, pour the mixture into a bowl and let it cool in the fridge for a little while or until your patience runs out.
  5. Preheat oven to 180 celsius.
  6. Whisk in one egg at a time. Keep an eye on how the texture is changing as each egg is whisked in! It’s pretty cool to watch.
  7. Pour into a pan (recommended size is roughly 20x20cm). The larger the pan, the thinner the batter will be and the shorter the baking time. For a smaller pan and thicker batter, try baking a little longer.
  8. Bake for around 20min. *This is where experiment helps. If it is very underbaked (i.e. very jiggly like unset jelly), bake for another 2 minutes at a time. I recommend baking it until it still jiggles a little. If it is completely firm, the cake will end up a little drier, but it’s not a disaster at all! If it’s too dry, just add some good cream cheese frosting!
  9.  Eat now, OR keep in fridge. Warm up a piece in the microwave (gasp) for about 20 seconds the next day. 

Cream cheese frosting

  • 100g butter
  • 200g cream cheese
  • 2-3 tablespoons cream or almond milk
  • erythritol/sweetener to taste
  1.  Brown the butter.
  2. Add cream cheese and melt.
  3. Add cream/almond milk and sweetener to taste.
  4.  Mix everything well until smooth, let it cool for at least two hours. Spread on torte OR, if you are going to heat up the torte in the future, spread on after heating.

 

Ice Cream

Real, real ice cream!

We play around with the recipe, but we’ve decided that for now we like a very rich ratio of 3 large egg yolks per 1 cup of heavy creamAdd some vanilla and erythritol (we like about 3 tablespoons in a full batch of ice cream with 6+ eggs) for a good vanilla base.

(And now you see why good ice cream really should be a treat: it’s very energy dense, quite a bit of effort if made properly, and not at all cheap to make tons of.)

We, um, operate a bit on the sacrilegious side of life here: we don’t cook the egg custard like you are traditionally meant to. Yikes. I recommend that you do, as you want to make sure you don’t end up with some funky Salmonella inside of you: FDA recommendation. Or you can just use already pasteurised eggs.

Once you have your (preferably cooked and bug-free) custard, put it in the ice cream maker and follow the instructions.

Usually you need to place the finished ice cream in the freezer for another twenty minutes or so until it is a little more firm, but, sometimes you just cannot wait that long:

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Green tea ice cream! With bonus torte floater.


 

Edit: shucks, forgot to add a photo of the green tea we got! A lovely gift from really great neighbours. I have no idea what it says on the packet (I hope not: “do not use in ice cream”), but we love it:

DSC_1020

 

 

‘Mix it, until it reaches a little bollie.’

Suzelle DIY makes a ‘carbon-hydrate’-free pizza with Prof Tim Noakes, followed by some bonus koeksisters, a sticky braided pipe bomb of sugar and flour.

If you’re not South African, the put-on accent may throw you off a bit (yes, it’s for laughs). If you know a Saffa, enjoy. 😀

Now go forth, make a lekker caulipizza!

A surprise bargain happened on Saturday when I spotted pork neck chops at 50% off. Okay buy!

pigoncauli

Finished product: pork neck chop on fried caulirice with some peppers and a creamy, seedy (literally) Dijon sauce.

I didn’t realise quite how enormous they were until I got home and made the first victim for dinner. I really should have only eaten half… But I don’t always learn my lessons.

Today’s lunch/dinner was to be the last of the pig necks. It needed some colour, so I added a little chopped celery, spring onion, leek and two half peppers.

Sadly only half a screaming pepper will make it into the pan.

Sadly only half a screaming pepper could be sacrificed for the pan today.

I also decided on a whim that today was D-Day for trying out fried caulirice. I already had a giant tub filled with grated cauliflower, so it wouldn’t waste any time to make. I fried up some of the greens in olive oil and threw in some caulirice as soon as I heard the frying in action.

Caulirice on the fry.

Caulirice on the fry.

After frying the neck chop and putting it on the bed of fried (c-)rice, I made a quick sauce with the peppers in the pan. A tablespoon of crème fraîche and Dijon mustard and a handful of sesame seeds later, the sauce was ready for the plate.

Review: fried caulirice will be eaten again! And again. It was great.

And thank you, pig.

This is breakfast all mixed up!

Weekday mornings don’t really lend themselves to laborious food preparation, so I try to keep it as simple as possible for my morning-brain.

Everyday easy breakfast.

Easy everyday breakfast.

I have a pre-mixed bag of nuts and seeds. The bulk of this mix usually contains flaxseed (linseed) and desiccated coconut, with as many chopped almonds and macadamias as I can afford at the time.

I scoop out about three to four tablespoons of supernutmix, about three tablespoons of Greek yoghurt and a generous tablespoon of cream (seter rømme in Norwegia, 35% fat).  Mix it up and munch!

Add a strawberry or two, and suddenly it’s dessert for breakfast!

I scored cheap, pre-chopped fatty bacon at a fancy shop!

Half of this bounty became the insides of a three-egg omelette, with some chopped green pepper and celery friends and grated cheese. I had over-stocked on leaves, so some rocket (rucola/roquette/arugula) and baby spinach joined the party on the side. And of course, no meal is complete without some avo.

This was over-filiing!

Omelette spilling its yummy guts.

After this 11am feast, I didn’t need to eat again until late evening, when I ended the day with a coconut milk and cocoa hot chocolate. Yes please.