Archives for posts with tag: nutrition

Here’s an introduction to the world of lipids, proteins, and other pieces making up the internal language of goo that runs us.

It’s an almost-40min presentation by Dr. Cate Shanahan, medical doctor and previously trained biochemist (YAY for science ladies!).

I won’t do any of the jargon justice, not yet anyway. So, here’s the presentation with a good deal of useful explanations on PUFA’s, oxidative stress, lipid panel measurements and what the hell these words mean:

Take a look at this blog and this blog post, specifically:
Dropping My Cholesterol At Record Speeds – Part 1.

 

This is just one man’s journey into the [real] science of cholesterols, but it is a fascinating process to watch (or read, rather) unfold!

Blogger Dave is kind enough to share all of his body data online. He is truly “putting himself out there” for everyone to see and showing what food input does to all your inner data.

Have a look!



— RECIPE —
1. Crisp bacon in pan. Slice liver and other stuff while this is happening.

2. Bacon out.
3. Fry sliced liver in bacon fat, a few minutes each side depending on thickness. It will darken as it cooks.
4. Add other stuff before liver is completely done, including bacon. Toss in pan.
*Note: I am not a fancy-hat chef. Making it up as I go. Did not die from this meal.


Liver. I had a go at it.

I’m in the “oh no, it’s liver, run!” camp, but I promised myself that I had to at least try to make it, once. And eat it.

I got a whole lamb liver on Friday from the local butcher. First impression: what this is so cheap! Should eat more often!

Today was the big day, but I ended up sick with some or other virus the whole weekend, so my plan of liver and onions and mushrooms vanished. The though of going out just to buy onions and shrooms was not appealing enough.

Lamb liver on the left. That is one amazing biological-computational processor right there. Respect it (even if it tastes liker… liver).

Plan B: liver with whatever is in the fridge.

This became liver with crispy bacon, garlic, cherry tomatoes, kale and a little marinara sauce.

First step: cook and crispify the bacon. Chop up the rest and slice the liver.
*Side note: slicing the liver was trippy! It felt like cutting through a hammerhead shark’s head. That was what was going through my own mind, in any case. It was a little mental and tactile adventure: the texture and colour is very, very different to muscle meat.
Once the bacon was crispy, I took it out and put the liver in to fry on medium high heat. I have no idea if this was the right way to do it…

Bacon up top, liver below.

Once the liver looked cooked through, I added the tomatoes, kale and garlic (which I had forgotten about, oops). On top came some spoons of marinara sauce.
I left this to heat for a while and finally tossed the bacon back in.

All together.

And that was about it. Pretty damn easy, but the smell of cooking liver was already making me nervous… Time to eat!

The verdict: liver is… liver, and will always be. It was quite okay with the crispy bacon, kale and tomatoes, and it was good enough that I will make it again.

The major upside is that I felt absolutely no need to overeat, one helping was more than enough for today. Lol.

Making it through a meal of liver was like a new “achievement unlocked” moment for me. The next achievement will be tomorrow’s leftovers… 😉

I woke up to a table of dreams today.

Marty Kendall from Optimising Nutrition posted an incredibly dense set of tabled data. Luckily he is an awesome person and took the time to sort out the data for everyone.

The end product: nutrient density analysis.

(Click on the table below or link above to go the full set of charts.)



The complete list of comparisons is found below the table, bottom right. He has given four main comparisons with all foods in each sheet, followed by the breakdown for each food group. Sweet. 🙂

The main comparisons are:

  • Nutrient Density vs % Insulinogenic
  • Nutrient Density vs Insulin Load
  • Nutrient Density vs Energy Density
  • Nutrient Density vs Net Carbohydrates

Marty uses “nutrient density” to describe the amount of nutrients per calorie of a foodstuff. Please see that link to his post on nutrient density to understand more about the different ways of measuring it.

Insulin load” is defined to include the combined effects of carbohydrates, fibre and protein, specifically:

insulin load = total carbohydrates – fibre + 0.56 x protein

He has defined the proportion of insulinogenic calories, “% insulinogenic“, as:

image011

Now, if all of this is completely overwhelming, it’s okay! Not everyone reacts well to this amount of information in graphs.

The basic ideas are useful though: if you want to get more micronutrients in, but don’t want to overdo your energy intake, there are certain foods that are perfect for this goal.

Similarly, if you are insulin resistant and want to control Type 2 Diabetes,  you can tailor your diet specifically to control your insulin response.

Of course, every single person is different. And that’s not even talking about the multitude of invisible friends (and/or foes) that live inside you: your own gut microbiota.

This means that what you eat might not have the exact same effect on you as your sibling or friend, but the ideas  above of optimising your diet are a fantastic starting point in the road to improving your health!

 


The bottom line, as always: eat real food!


 

Take that, 1984 Time Magazine cover of doom!

image

Most people just don’t have the time to figure everything out from scratch. And that is where a simple graphic, understandable-at-a-glance, can make all the difference!

Thanks to physician Ted Naiman for putting together this simple gem:

macros

REAL FOOD.

(The original image can be found here. Give the blog a visit, too. )

Print, laminate and stick this one on the fridge!

 

No, actually, please don’t!

However, if there is one thing you read today or this weekend, please make it this:

I Fooled Millions Into Thinking Chocolate Helps Weightloss. Here’s How by John Bohannon.

Eat chocolate daily, concludes German researchers. Sound so professional.

This is a sublime demonstration of seemingly legit science that quickly gets gobbled up by a gullible media looking for clickbait and revenue. It is downright scary.

If you read all the way through, you will hopefully get a better grasp on why nutritional science has been sending us on a rollercoaster of conflicting recommendations. Eggsarebadyouwilldie! Margerinegood! Noeggsarehealthynow! Eatdinnerforbreakfast! Norathereatlotsofsmallmealsaday! Margerinethedevilnow! Brainfreeze. How on earth are we meant to take any recommendations seriously again.

Hopefully the future will bring us rigorous, irrefutable nutritional studies. And maybe one day science won’t be drowning in the statistical spin that just serves to hurt the entire scientific community.

“Sorry seems to be the hardest word”
Dr Malcolm Kendrick on the 2015 report on US dietary guidelines.

Dr Kendrick sums up some of the key amendments in the report:
“In short. Cholesterol is healthy, saturated fat is healthy, salt is healthy and sugar is unhealthy. I have pulled those four points out of a press release by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, which I reproduce in full, below.”

It is a good day. Time for some coffee with a splash of cream.

Dr. Malcolm Kendrick

I think that the four words ‘I told you so’ should only be thought, and never written down. No-one likes a smart arse. But sometimes it is impossible to resist….just impossible. In this case I have failed. ‘Father forgive me, for I am weak.’ So, here goes…’I told you so.’

Some of you may be aware that the US dietary guidelines are going to be changed. For some reason it is required that the full report is suppressed for about a year. Presumably so that everyone can pile high their defences when the attacks begin. ‘I think you will find that I have always, ahem, supported these ideas.’ Cough, shuffle of papers….cough. ‘Sorry, no time to take questions.’ Exit left.

The entire report, I believe, stretches to about a bazillion pages. However, here are four of the highlights.

  • Cholesterol is to be dropped from the…

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