Archives for posts with tag: ketogenic
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Completely flourless egg muffins, this time with bacon, pork mince, red bell pepper, onion and kale.


Flourless breakfast muffins, the pork mince version (18)

What
18 eggs
220g bacon, chopped
220g pork mince, break apart in pan
1 white onion, chopped
1 red bell pepper, chopped
100g kale, finely chopped
salt, pepper and other spices that you think will make this interesting…

How
1. All eggs in giant mixing bowl.
2. Chop everything else.
3. Pre-heat oven to… 180° C, or even 200° C (350 – 400° F).
3. Cook bacon and onions in pan. (Bacon first, add onions once there is lots of bacon fat all over.)
4. Cook mince and kale in pan. (Mince first, add kale once mince is cooked. Mix up with spatula.)
5. Add everything to giant mixing bowl and mix very well.
6. Divide into 18 muffin cups. I use (and love) silicone forms.
7. Bake at 180° C – 200° C (350 – 400° F) for 10-15min until the egg muffins rise well. My oven is old an creative with temperature, hence vague temperature and time guideline…

Stats
*Note: these are very rough numbers with a lot of “let’s just round this up” going on.

Total for 18 muffins:
2 627kCal
194g fat
36g net cho
189g protein

Per muffin:
146 kCal
11g fat
2g net cho
10,5g protein


 

These egg muffins are easy to make, I promise, even if you suck at making food. Making so many at once will save you a lot of time and sweat throughout the rest of the week, so the effort really is worth it.

I added pork mince this time, purely because there was a sale and I couldn’t ignore the price, especially considering I live in Norwegia where good food hardly ever comes at a good price.

Process, in pictures

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As  always, you live and learn… Once I had added all the ingredients into the mixing bowl, I realised the mixture was a bit too solid and not eggy enough. I started with a dozen eggs, so I decided to add half a dozen more. Random decision, I think four would have been enough.

Cooking time was a very approximate 15min. I’ve made these before a long time ago in a better oven far, far away. That time it took 10 minutes to get delicious egg muffins, this time I had to experiment. My mom was telling the absolute truth when she told me that you always have to get to know your oven first… It’s a long-term relationship that shouldn’t be based on false expectations.

A note about using silicone pans: put them on the oven rack before you add any ingredients! They are soft and you will spill all the raw ‘dough’ out if you try to pick it up like a normal, rigid pan. Other than that, they are awesome, the best thing being the  almost non-existent cleaning time. 🙂

 

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And, done!

I was freaking hungry while making these,  so it was great to finally to dig into a hot, fresh egg muffin! I added some avocado that needed to be eaten asap. AND a great surprise from my not-so-great oven was that there was still a little bit of hot runny egg yolk in the middle.

I used to hate egg yolks when I was little. I have no idea what was wrong with me.

I added rosemary and basil to this recipe and I’m very happy with the result. Will repeat.

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Aubergine (eggplant) Pizza: the minced meat version

  • Slice an aubergine into slices about 1cm thick. Long slices, round slices, whatever you want.
  • Sprinkle coarse salt over aubergine slices and let them sit for about 30min. The salt should draw some of the moisture out.
  • Pre-heat oven to 180deg celsius.
  • Lightly press slices with a paper towel, place slices in an oven dish or baking paper, sprinkle with a little olive oil.
  • Bake for about 30min (time depends on thickness of slices).
  • Smear a little tomato paste on each and cover with a thin layer of minced meat (ground beef).
  • Bake for 15min.
  • Take out and cover with spices (eg. salt, pepper, garlic, oregano), cheese and red peppers.
  • Bake for 5-10min, until cheese is melted and as crispy as you want it.

 

No, I’m obviously not a precise-recipe person. I generally just open the fridge and figure it out from there.

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Eggplant pizza! Yes, the red pepper slices rolled off a bit… I was impatient.

 

This recipe is thanks to a great friend who went out of her way to make me a keto-friendly dinner! How awesome is that. Supportive friends are absolute gold in a world where judgement can be quick and brutal.

And now I have found my new Friday-night food! I can also confirm that it tastes good cold the next morning, too. (Or maybe I was just really hungry…)

This recipe is a billion times easier, and cheaper, than making any of the low-carb pizza doughs. I love those, but I’m so excited about these that it’ll be a while before I make cauliflower or mozzarella dough again.

Eggplant ftw!

 

I’m systematically eating my way through the fridge. The deadline for a clean fridge is 23rd December. I’ll be on a plane the next day.

Late last night I realised my seterrømme (Norwegian sour cream) was past the best before date, so today is rømmegrøt day: for breakfast and dinner.

I wrote a post on it some months back with the recipe, here.

The problem is that I love this too much! I just ate half of my sour cream porridge for the day and I think I am about to explode in slow-motion.

This also means that I’ll be attacking the other half later today. Muuuuch later. I honestly don’t know if I’ll be hungry ever again.

But for now I need to figure out the most comfortable way to roll down the hill to get to the office. And it just started hailing. Yay.

Photo on 2015-12-10 at 8.53 AM

Bad photo of rømmegrøt in a flask (keeps it a little warmer for longer).

November and December in Norway are busy months of feasting!
Every group, workplace or sports club or circle of friends organises a Julebord, i.e. a Christmas table. Dress up smart and be prepared for a great night of food and strong alcohol.

This year I was lucky enough to be invited to friends who were having an evening with saueskolt (sheep’s head) from Sunnfjord. I’m used to it being called smalahove, but I’ve learned that there are differences between the two, apart from just the dialect. (Smalahove is the term used in the Voss and Bergen area.)

My friend said that they always had sheep’s head on Skoltesøndag, or as it is also known, skitne-søndag. Dirty Sunday.

Dirty Sunday is the Sunday before Christmas where you wash everything and prepare your house for Christmas. So you end up wearing your dirty clothes, sparing the clean ones for the next week’s big gathering. (This just made me think that we have it too easy these days. I have enough clothes to get me through a week without needing this kind of Dirty Sunday.)

And so, in your dirty clothes, you eat salted, smoked and boiled sheep’s head for dinner for the last time before the next year’s autumn comes.

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Saueskolter på bordet.

It’s not my first time eating Norwegian-style sheep’s head, so I was more excited than grossed out at the prospect. The first time I was a little bit nervous, but I figured my Afrikaans sheep-farmer ancestors would be rolling in their graves, and rolling their eyes, if I didn’t man up and enjoy the meal.

It was awesome. And on that night I learned that a lamb’s eyeball is delicious.

The sheep’s head is smoked and salted, and finally boiled the day that it will be served, giving it a heavy flavour that goes beautifully with whiskey or akevitt. Or a deep red wine.

The only part that creeps me out a little is the inner texture of the cheeks. It’s bumpy. Apparently I have issues with texture sometimes (the same reason why fruit bits in otherwise smooth yoghurt makes my skin crawl).

The rest is fantastic. And the eye! That’s the last part and the best. It’s very similar to bone marrow in both taste and texture. And since bone marrow has been one of my favourite things in the world since I was a baby, I am now an eyeball-lover. Just remember to remove the pupil…

Once you have the eyeball worked and scooped out of the socket, you prod it with your fork, pop into your mouth and wash down with a shot of akevitt.

Dirty Sunday is the best Sunday, even though we had ours on a Saturday evening in November. 🙂

 

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DONE! A plastic surgeon could probably have done a better job, but I tried my best to get every piece!

I’m posting this more as a “note-to-self” than anything else.

I haven’t done much research on this at all, mostly because it takes a lot of time to find sane and compelling sources, so it is highly likely that a lot of the answers I’m looking for are out there.

If anyone actually reads this and is involved in the field, please let me know!

There is such a wide spread of hormonal experiences when transitioning to ketosis on all the forums and groups I visit online. Some women lose their cycles, for how long I don’t know.  Many who stay on a ketogenic diet seem to regain a normal cycle after some months, but I have absolutely no idea what the norm is. I don’t know if a norm exists. And then some are on birth control, some not.

I don’t make any conclusions because all reported experiences end up being an echo-chamber. The only conclusion I have so far is that different things happen to different women, but there seem to be a few subsets of common experiences.

There are two things in particular that interest me:

  • the differences between menstrual cycles on a ketogenic diet, a non-ketogenic carb-restricted diet, a “normal” middle-of-the-road diet, and a very low-fat diet,
  • the effects of different forms of hormonal birth control on all of the above cases.

The first set of baseline questions seem to me to cover the continuum of metabolic regimes. (My background is in applied maths and fluid mechanics, so it seems that this is how I now process the world: hard definitions, mathematically defined regimes and effects during regime changes. What have I become!)

It should go without saying that this kind of data should be long-term data and tested for metabolically healthy women as well as those who have already developed shit like PCOS.

Then I want the corresponding set of data for the same questions, but during periods of active weight (i.e. fat) loss.

I really want good sets of data to exist with ALL the parameters available. Influences on mood, period pain (damn you forever omega 6’s and prostaglandins), bloating, PMS-cravings, flow rate, cervical mucous, give me everything.

With online food-tracking and cycle-tracking being as easy as it is these days, there really is no excuse. It should be “relatively simple” to get a first-pass investigation going with so many people voluntarily switching to different diet regimes.

Tools like MyFitnessPal, My Days, FatSecret and all similar apps are sitting on a wealth of information. I want it!

All the data. That’s my Christmas wish.

 

 

 

The last week has delivered two absolute gems to my screen.

The first, Strong Medicine by Dr Blake F. Donaldson, is available to read and download on Babel!

I accidentally came upon it via Ash Simmonds and his HighSteaks blog. His meat-filled twitter feed is also recommended. (I have to admit that I’m getting absolute grills, Afrikaans for the heebeejeebees, mentioning some stranger’s twitter feed. StalkerPro here.)

The book itself is quite the entertaining read! A lot of pervasive life truths are punctuated by some boldly stated and highly cringeworthy thoughts straight out of a totally different cultural era. It is a bit of a rollercoaster, but Doc Donaldson pulls out some great one-liners that keep me reading, consider:

“It seems to me there are three horns to the dilemma of the fat man.”

and

“There are probably only two perfect foods-fresh fat meat and clean water.”

Always cutting straight to the point, as he also was in his recommendations to patients:

“Unless you are willing to stop eating flour now and forever, I don’t want to take care of you.”

But the zinger award must surely go to:

“You are out of your mind when you take insulin in order to eat a Danish pastry.”

And then there are musings on medical science that shows some perceptions really have not changed, not one little bit:

“…cholesterol has been made a whipping boy, which is unjustified.
Since the determination of its importance much of the research work on cholesterol has been abandoned, though some is still going on. Talk about cholesterol is old hat, forget it, and certainly it would never help you with weight reduction.”

Sigh.

Donaldson put his patients on a very strict but simple regimen, mostly fatty red meat and coffee three times a day. After the desired sustainable weight was reached, meals could be expanded to include four ingredients. I had a look at my breakfast of eggs, chorizo and tomato cooked in ghee and thought, ja, why overdo the ingredient list and make it more complicated for my body. It’s just a machine, after all.

The man had a sympathetic heart to make up for his stern and strong medicine. He recalls his experiences of working in a hall of soldiers in varying stages of recovery or death, or both, after mustard gas exposure. He crafts a striking image of a Hungarian violinist coming to the hospital ward to play beautiful songs by request from the suffering men, but the doctor, having built up strong armour to defend against the daily horrors of slow deaths, is suddenly overwhelmed by the atmosphere:

“As the strains of that old melody swept through the hall I had to leave. Some things in life you just can’t take.”


The other goodie was another one of the lectures from the Low Carb Down Under series: Marty Kendall on “Managing Insulin to Optimise Nutrition”.

If you know someone who is unlucky enough to have Type 1 Diabetes, have them watch this talk. There is no sensationalism and the explanation behind why Marty and his wife eat like they do is wonderfully clear and logically explained.

But also, this is science communication done right! Yay!

By this I mean that someone has not only made an effort to understand the underlying science, but has taken the extra (and necessary) step of translating it beautifully so that I can get an intuitive grasp of what the hell you are on about. I don’t want to spend two minutes figuring out your graph and axes in a short lecture. Stick some proper labels and pictures in the graph so that I can see what’s up! I think it can be even better, as is always the case, but this is already great to see. Clear, concise and pretty.

Marty Kendall’s blog is over at Optimising Nutrition. Go have a look.

I’m pretty much living at work at the moment, so pre-prepared meals are crucial.

My daily dinner for this week consists of mixed green leaves, some red bell peppers, 3x meatballs (consisting only of mince, greek yogurt and a little butter), avocado and a dollop crème fraîche on top.

I can eat like this forever! 😀

Staple diet of awesomeness.

Staple diet of awesomeness.

Dr Eric Westman, current president of the American Society of Bariatric Physicians, talks through the steps of starting a ketogenic diet and discusses some of the things you can do to make your life easier.

One useful tip I learned was that a cup of greens or other veggies is roughly equivalent to a fist-size. I loathe measuring cauliflower and broccoli, mostly because I don’t care for being that precise, so this is a great way to learn to eyeball a serving of veggies.