Archives for posts with tag: diet

Angus beef patty sale! Hooray for spur-of-the-moment shopping trips.

Having one patty for lunch and cooking the rest for lunch the next few days.

 

Woot woot! Near expiry date, marked down. Yesss.

 

 

With ricotta and Dijon mustard ‘sauce’.

 

Yummmmmmmmmmmm.

Sorry to anyone in Bergen, Norwegia. All four packages went home with me.

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Completely flourless egg muffins, this time with bacon, pork mince, red bell pepper, onion and kale.


Flourless breakfast muffins, the pork mince version (18)

What
18 eggs
220g bacon, chopped
220g pork mince, break apart in pan
1 white onion, chopped
1 red bell pepper, chopped
100g kale, finely chopped
salt, pepper and other spices that you think will make this interesting…

How
1. All eggs in giant mixing bowl.
2. Chop everything else.
3. Pre-heat oven to… 180° C, or even 200° C (350 – 400° F).
3. Cook bacon and onions in pan. (Bacon first, add onions once there is lots of bacon fat all over.)
4. Cook mince and kale in pan. (Mince first, add kale once mince is cooked. Mix up with spatula.)
5. Add everything to giant mixing bowl and mix very well.
6. Divide into 18 muffin cups. I use (and love) silicone forms.
7. Bake at 180° C – 200° C (350 – 400° F) for 10-15min until the egg muffins rise well. My oven is old an creative with temperature, hence vague temperature and time guideline…

Stats
*Note: these are very rough numbers with a lot of “let’s just round this up” going on.

Total for 18 muffins:
2 627kCal
194g fat
36g net cho
189g protein

Per muffin:
146 kCal
11g fat
2g net cho
10,5g protein


 

These egg muffins are easy to make, I promise, even if you suck at making food. Making so many at once will save you a lot of time and sweat throughout the rest of the week, so the effort really is worth it.

I added pork mince this time, purely because there was a sale and I couldn’t ignore the price, especially considering I live in Norwegia where good food hardly ever comes at a good price.

Process, in pictures

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As  always, you live and learn… Once I had added all the ingredients into the mixing bowl, I realised the mixture was a bit too solid and not eggy enough. I started with a dozen eggs, so I decided to add half a dozen more. Random decision, I think four would have been enough.

Cooking time was a very approximate 15min. I’ve made these before a long time ago in a better oven far, far away. That time it took 10 minutes to get delicious egg muffins, this time I had to experiment. My mom was telling the absolute truth when she told me that you always have to get to know your oven first… It’s a long-term relationship that shouldn’t be based on false expectations.

A note about using silicone pans: put them on the oven rack before you add any ingredients! They are soft and you will spill all the raw ‘dough’ out if you try to pick it up like a normal, rigid pan. Other than that, they are awesome, the best thing being the  almost non-existent cleaning time. 🙂

 

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And, done!

I was freaking hungry while making these,  so it was great to finally to dig into a hot, fresh egg muffin! I added some avocado that needed to be eaten asap. AND a great surprise from my not-so-great oven was that there was still a little bit of hot runny egg yolk in the middle.

I used to hate egg yolks when I was little. I have no idea what was wrong with me.

I added rosemary and basil to this recipe and I’m very happy with the result. Will repeat.

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— RECIPE —
1. Crisp bacon in pan. Slice liver and other stuff while this is happening.

2. Bacon out.
3. Fry sliced liver in bacon fat, a few minutes each side depending on thickness. It will darken as it cooks.
4. Add other stuff before liver is completely done, including bacon. Toss in pan.
*Note: I am not a fancy-hat chef. Making it up as I go. Did not die from this meal.


Liver. I had a go at it.

I’m in the “oh no, it’s liver, run!” camp, but I promised myself that I had to at least try to make it, once. And eat it.

I got a whole lamb liver on Friday from the local butcher. First impression: what this is so cheap! Should eat more often!

Today was the big day, but I ended up sick with some or other virus the whole weekend, so my plan of liver and onions and mushrooms vanished. The though of going out just to buy onions and shrooms was not appealing enough.

Lamb liver on the left. That is one amazing biological-computational processor right there. Respect it (even if it tastes liker… liver).

Plan B: liver with whatever is in the fridge.

This became liver with crispy bacon, garlic, cherry tomatoes, kale and a little marinara sauce.

First step: cook and crispify the bacon. Chop up the rest and slice the liver.
*Side note: slicing the liver was trippy! It felt like cutting through a hammerhead shark’s head. That was what was going through my own mind, in any case. It was a little mental and tactile adventure: the texture and colour is very, very different to muscle meat.
Once the bacon was crispy, I took it out and put the liver in to fry on medium high heat. I have no idea if this was the right way to do it…

Bacon up top, liver below.

Once the liver looked cooked through, I added the tomatoes, kale and garlic (which I had forgotten about, oops). On top came some spoons of marinara sauce.
I left this to heat for a while and finally tossed the bacon back in.

All together.

And that was about it. Pretty damn easy, but the smell of cooking liver was already making me nervous… Time to eat!

The verdict: liver is… liver, and will always be. It was quite okay with the crispy bacon, kale and tomatoes, and it was good enough that I will make it again.

The major upside is that I felt absolutely no need to overeat, one helping was more than enough for today. Lol.

Making it through a meal of liver was like a new “achievement unlocked” moment for me. The next achievement will be tomorrow’s leftovers… 😉

Lol.
Dinner today: kale, alfalfa sprouts, 3 cherry tomatoes and mince (ground beef) that was in the form of meatballs until shortly prior to hitting the plate.

Halfway through: o shit I forgot to wash the kale and found some extra protein wandering around. Well, I hope he didn’t have any friends…

I woke up to a table of dreams today.

Marty Kendall from Optimising Nutrition posted an incredibly dense set of tabled data. Luckily he is an awesome person and took the time to sort out the data for everyone.

The end product: nutrient density analysis.

(Click on the table below or link above to go the full set of charts.)



The complete list of comparisons is found below the table, bottom right. He has given four main comparisons with all foods in each sheet, followed by the breakdown for each food group. Sweet. 🙂

The main comparisons are:

  • Nutrient Density vs % Insulinogenic
  • Nutrient Density vs Insulin Load
  • Nutrient Density vs Energy Density
  • Nutrient Density vs Net Carbohydrates

Marty uses “nutrient density” to describe the amount of nutrients per calorie of a foodstuff. Please see that link to his post on nutrient density to understand more about the different ways of measuring it.

Insulin load” is defined to include the combined effects of carbohydrates, fibre and protein, specifically:

insulin load = total carbohydrates – fibre + 0.56 x protein

He has defined the proportion of insulinogenic calories, “% insulinogenic“, as:

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Now, if all of this is completely overwhelming, it’s okay! Not everyone reacts well to this amount of information in graphs.

The basic ideas are useful though: if you want to get more micronutrients in, but don’t want to overdo your energy intake, there are certain foods that are perfect for this goal.

Similarly, if you are insulin resistant and want to control Type 2 Diabetes,  you can tailor your diet specifically to control your insulin response.

Of course, every single person is different. And that’s not even talking about the multitude of invisible friends (and/or foes) that live inside you: your own gut microbiota.

This means that what you eat might not have the exact same effect on you as your sibling or friend, but the ideas  above of optimising your diet are a fantastic starting point in the road to improving your health!

 


The bottom line, as always: eat real food!


 


Aubergine (eggplant) Pizza: the minced meat version

  • Slice an aubergine into slices about 1cm thick. Long slices, round slices, whatever you want.
  • Sprinkle coarse salt over aubergine slices and let them sit for about 30min. The salt should draw some of the moisture out.
  • Pre-heat oven to 180deg celsius.
  • Lightly press slices with a paper towel, place slices in an oven dish or baking paper, sprinkle with a little olive oil.
  • Bake for about 30min (time depends on thickness of slices).
  • Smear a little tomato paste on each and cover with a thin layer of minced meat (ground beef).
  • Bake for 15min.
  • Take out and cover with spices (eg. salt, pepper, garlic, oregano), cheese and red peppers.
  • Bake for 5-10min, until cheese is melted and as crispy as you want it.

 

No, I’m obviously not a precise-recipe person. I generally just open the fridge and figure it out from there.

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Eggplant pizza! Yes, the red pepper slices rolled off a bit… I was impatient.

 

This recipe is thanks to a great friend who went out of her way to make me a keto-friendly dinner! How awesome is that. Supportive friends are absolute gold in a world where judgement can be quick and brutal.

And now I have found my new Friday-night food! I can also confirm that it tastes good cold the next morning, too. (Or maybe I was just really hungry…)

This recipe is a billion times easier, and cheaper, than making any of the low-carb pizza doughs. I love those, but I’m so excited about these that it’ll be a while before I make cauliflower or mozzarella dough again.

Eggplant ftw!

 

Take that, 1984 Time Magazine cover of doom!

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Most people just don’t have the time to figure everything out from scratch. And that is where a simple graphic, understandable-at-a-glance, can make all the difference!

Thanks to physician Ted Naiman for putting together this simple gem:

macros

REAL FOOD.

(The original image can be found here. Give the blog a visit, too. )

Print, laminate and stick this one on the fridge!

 

Healthy kids in control!

Watch “Diary of a Diabetic Kid” about young Gabriel Van Wesemael who was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes and then had to hop onto the glucose high-and-low bus.
He finally got helpful advice from his GP and switched to a low-carbohydrate diet. (Shout-out to Dr Neville Wellington.)

Since then he has been able to reduce his insulin injections and lives with much more stable blood glucose levels. Awesomeness!

He has recently launched a YouTube channel, Gabriel’s Diabetic Kitchen, with Type 1-friendly recipes as well as a Facebook page. Go have a look and spread the word!

A Canadian senate committee has just released a new report, along with some very nice summaries for public consumption, on obesity in Canada and what to do about it.

Why is this report a little less depressing than other governmental reports from around the world? It is pushing research, and therefore funding, into areas that are difficult to fund without government support.
And the people involved have the guts to call their current guidelines dated, which, to me, is a euphemism for just a little bit incorrect:
Canada’s dated food guide is no longer effective in providing nutritional guidance to Canadians. Fruit juice, for instance, is presented as a healthy item when it is little more than a soft drink without the bubbles.

Recommendations

I wanted to list a bunch of the recommendations, but I’ll stick to two…
Get a strong group of scientists to ask challenging research questions across disciplines, not just nutritionists:

Recommendation 7

The committee further recommends that the Minister of Health revise the food guide on the guidance of an advisory body which:

  • Comprises experts in relevant areas of study, including but not limited to nutrition, medicine, metabolism, biochemistry, and biology; 
The second-to-last recommendation sums it up nicely. I quite like that this paragraph does not keep hammering on about poor diet and obesity, but rather poor diet and chronic disease. This is where society’s money and people’s quality of life goes down the drain, but it doesn’t have to be that way.

Recommendation 20

The committee therefore recommends that Health Canada design and implement a public awareness campaign on healthy eating based on tested, simple messaging. These messages should relate to, but not be limited to:

  • Most of the healthiest food doesn’t require a label;
  • Meal preparation and enjoyment;
  • Reduced consumption of processed foods; and,
  • The link between poor diet and chronic disease.

 

Report links

The report summary is very user-friendly and includes:

 

Of course, you can also read the whole report (pdf warning, 56 pages) if brevity is not your thing.