Archives for the month of: June, 2016

I woke up to a table of dreams today.

Marty Kendall from Optimising Nutrition posted an incredibly dense set of tabled data. Luckily he is an awesome person and took the time to sort out the data for everyone.

The end product: nutrient density analysis.

(Click on the table below or link above to go the full set of charts.)



The complete list of comparisons is found below the table, bottom right. He has given four main comparisons with all foods in each sheet, followed by the breakdown for each food group. Sweet. 🙂

The main comparisons are:

  • Nutrient Density vs % Insulinogenic
  • Nutrient Density vs Insulin Load
  • Nutrient Density vs Energy Density
  • Nutrient Density vs Net Carbohydrates

Marty uses “nutrient density” to describe the amount of nutrients per calorie of a foodstuff. Please see that link to his post on nutrient density to understand more about the different ways of measuring it.

Insulin load” is defined to include the combined effects of carbohydrates, fibre and protein, specifically:

insulin load = total carbohydrates – fibre + 0.56 x protein

He has defined the proportion of insulinogenic calories, “% insulinogenic“, as:

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Now, if all of this is completely overwhelming, it’s okay! Not everyone reacts well to this amount of information in graphs.

The basic ideas are useful though: if you want to get more micronutrients in, but don’t want to overdo your energy intake, there are certain foods that are perfect for this goal.

Similarly, if you are insulin resistant and want to control Type 2 Diabetes,  you can tailor your diet specifically to control your insulin response.

Of course, every single person is different. And that’s not even talking about the multitude of invisible friends (and/or foes) that live inside you: your own gut microbiota.

This means that what you eat might not have the exact same effect on you as your sibling or friend, but the ideas  above of optimising your diet are a fantastic starting point in the road to improving your health!

 


The bottom line, as always: eat real food!


 


Aubergine (eggplant) Pizza: the minced meat version

  • Slice an aubergine into slices about 1cm thick. Long slices, round slices, whatever you want.
  • Sprinkle coarse salt over aubergine slices and let them sit for about 30min. The salt should draw some of the moisture out.
  • Pre-heat oven to 180deg celsius.
  • Lightly press slices with a paper towel, place slices in an oven dish or baking paper, sprinkle with a little olive oil.
  • Bake for about 30min (time depends on thickness of slices).
  • Smear a little tomato paste on each and cover with a thin layer of minced meat (ground beef).
  • Bake for 15min.
  • Take out and cover with spices (eg. salt, pepper, garlic, oregano), cheese and red peppers.
  • Bake for 5-10min, until cheese is melted and as crispy as you want it.

 

No, I’m obviously not a precise-recipe person. I generally just open the fridge and figure it out from there.

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Eggplant pizza! Yes, the red pepper slices rolled off a bit… I was impatient.

 

This recipe is thanks to a great friend who went out of her way to make me a keto-friendly dinner! How awesome is that. Supportive friends are absolute gold in a world where judgement can be quick and brutal.

And now I have found my new Friday-night food! I can also confirm that it tastes good cold the next morning, too. (Or maybe I was just really hungry…)

This recipe is a billion times easier, and cheaper, than making any of the low-carb pizza doughs. I love those, but I’m so excited about these that it’ll be a while before I make cauliflower or mozzarella dough again.

Eggplant ftw!