Some days you come across something that just makes you want to toss your laptop out the window.

Today that something is this video of the “USDA Great Nutrition Debate” of February 2000. (The USDA here is the United States Department of Agriculture.)

At first I was confused what Dean Ornish was doing there, because I’d never seen Dr Atkins speak in person and the video looks like it’s from 1980. My mental timeline was apparently severely messed up. I also realise how far we’ve come in the last 15 years with regards to video quality… Thank goodness! (“Next slide. … Next slide, please. Slide.”)

Well, that’s the debate.

And what do you know, there is Atkins himself sounding like a very rational man. I grew up amongst the “Atkins and meat will kill you” culture, and firmly believed it, even though I knew absolutely nothing about biology or nutrition (I’m still deeply embarrassed about everything I used to say as if I “knew” it).

A lot of the debate in the video really just feel like adventures in missing the point. I was going to go through a few thoughts, but it feels pointless and I’d honestly get more satisfaction from seeing my laptop sail through the rainy Norwegian skies. That is until I have to replace it, of course.

Seriously. Around 2:46:00 the question of keto-breath arises. Pffffff honestly. Choose between some potentially slight bad breath and diabetes or worse? That’s the definition of a no-brainer. The bad breath also generally goes away quite quickly, in case anyone reads this and is wondering about it. I was very happy to hear Dr Atkins saying “This is serious stuff.”

2:47:20-ish, Atkins replies to a concern about his high-protein diet: “I am concerned by the American Heart Association’s recommendations of Fruit Loops and Pop Tarts having their seal of approval. If that’s their recommendation, then I’m certainly happy that they’re not in my camp. I wouldn’t want them there.” YES. It seems there were at least two enlightened audience members in attendance.

I wish we had seen this video back in 2000. That way I wouldn’t have had to watch my dad eat his way through low-fat, hypertensive misery into a stroke. I’m not claiming the stroke could have been prevented, but I know I’d much rather live eating very happily and heartily and then keeling over. It most definitely beats the guilt and stress of stupid diets and dying anyway.

I’m having eggs for breakfast. And I’ll be cooking them in lamb fat.

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